Follow By Timothy L. Miller
Date of Review: 1/30/2011
Manufactures Website: http://shop.dyepaintball.com/
Price (RRP): MSRP $1449

Dye NT

Site Score
4.6
Good: Light
Bad: Expensive
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User Score
7.3
(3 votes)
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Dye NT Review

Review Product Setup: 2010 NT stock, UL barrel, Prophecy, 68/4500

The NT is Dyes latest marker. Marketed as being incredible efficiency from a spool valve, their marketing hype breaks down when you test it. This is an unbalanced spool valve, so you don’t have to worry about LPR. Everything runs off the same input pressure of ~130 psi. With the high efficiency bolt insert, it can get 1500 shots off a 68/4500. With the soft shot bolt insert that you will want to use to shoot tournament level paint out of this marker (and given the price, you should shoot tournament level paint), you’ll get 1300-1400 shots off a 68/4500. By comparison, the PM8/DM9/DM10/DM11 when tuned properly can get 1500-1600, Quests with the new RSF or 4B can get 1700-1900, Droids can get 1500-1600, Clones can get 1600-1800. Not nearly as efficient as Dye would like you to believe in their marketing.

The place the NT shines is weight. I have never shot a stock, mass produced marker that is lighter than this. Even the G3/G4 weighs about the same. I will give Dye huge cudos on that. This thing is LIGHT.

Like all spools, you’ll need to lube this often, and you need to lube it correctly. Underlubed and it’ll either leak or get FSDO and bolt stick, overlubed and you’ll get FSDO and bolt stick. Easy marker to pull apart, but boy are there a lot of orings, of a lot of different sizes. Mine (bought used) actually arrived with a leak, and so one of the first things I did was a full tear-down and oring replacement. ALL the orings are standard sizes. Dye goes with color coded orings to make it easier to identify, but they are all standard sizes and if you don’t feel like paying extra for the colored ones, you can use standard orings (I’m color blind so I used standard orings).

Shooting it, it shoots much like most spools. It has basically no kick, very smooth. The only way you can actually feel the kick is to shoot it back to back with something that has even less (DM, quest, Clone). The new UL board supports everything for current tournament rules, and is easily programmable (but you do have to watch blinking lights, no oled stock). The trigger is IMO the best UL trigger ever. A bit nicer design to it, closer to the Critical type trigger. Very little side to side slop.

For 2011, Dye has updated the design to improve on almost everything. The OP has been dropped to ~110 psi, bolt insert and spacers are simplified, and several known failure issues have been fixed (such as the rear spool bumper). If one has the money, these can all be moved over into the NT10 to upgrade. I am hoping to get some myself to see if it improves the NT significantly or not.

As it stands, the NT is a nice marker, but far too overpriced given it’s not as smooth or efficient as many markers cheaper than it.

 

Advantages:

• Lightweight

 

Disadvantages:

• Not as smooth as the DM series

• Not as efficient as a properly set up DM

• More expensive than a DM

• Even more involved maintenance than a DM

 

Conclusion/Verdict:

If you’ve just gotta have the newest, most hyped marker out there, this is the marker for you. If you prefer to have great value, this is one to pass. It offers absolutely nothing other than weight as an advantage to markers costing ½ it’s price, and is more complex internally than even the already complex DM series.

 

By Timothy L. Miller

Date of Review: 1/30/2011

Manufactures Website: http://shop.dyepaintball.com/

Price (RRP): MSRP $1449

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User Score
7.3
(3 votes)
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Dye NT, 7.3 out of 10 based on 3 ratings

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